My Blog

  • A good athletic shoe should not flex through the arch, it should not be able to be easily twisted and it should have a stable heel counter. 
  • Athletic shoes no matter the brand are typically separated into three categories: Neutral, Support, and Motion Control.
  • If you have a high arch, you will benefit from a neutral type athletic shoe.
  • If you have an average to slightly pronated foot type, you will benefit from a support type athletic shoe.
  • If you have a flat foot, you will benefit from a motion control athletic shoe.
  • Athletic shoes wear out after about 500 miles so make sure your shoes aren’t getting too old.

Heel slippage?... try this lacing technique. 

Instead of crisscrossing all the way up the shoe, run the laces up parallel on the last eyelet. Then cross the laces and pull through the loop you have made. This makes the lacing more snug at the ankle and keeps your heel from slipping.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top of Foot Pain?...  try this lacing technique.

Instead of crisscrossing all the way up the shoe, run the laces up parallel when you are halfway up, or where the bump on your foot is. Then finish lacing as you normally would. This makes the lacing leave an opening to give your arch or the sore spot a little more room.

 

 

February 26, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Heel Pain  

First step in the morning heel pain is a classic sign of plantar fasciitis. 

It is the most common cause of heel pain a localized inflammation of the plantar fascia. Patients with plantar fasciitis describe an ache localized to the inside part of the heel. Other descriptions are tugging, pulling and burning. The pain can range from mild to severe and can interfere with activities. 

It can be cause from overuse, minor mechanical issues with the foot/arch structure, or wearing unsupportive shoes.

Supportive shoes, over-the counter anti-inflammatories (if tolerated), and gentle calf stretching can often ease the symptoms of plantar fasciitis. 

If the condition persists more involved conservative treatment is recommended. 

By Ankle & Foot Clinic
October 05, 2016
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Pain   Ankle Pain   Joint Pain  

Joint Pain In FeetWith more than 30 joints in your foot, joint pain may seem like it can come from anywhere and everywhere. Swelling, tenderness, stiffness, redness, bruising or increased warmth--these all can come along with the pain and can be caused by trauma, infection, arthritis, bursitis, gout or structural foot problems. With such an unpleasant litany of symptoms and causes, it's helpful to know a few simple tips to ease your pain before you visit your podiatrist for a full diagnosis.

Joint Pain Treatment

When you first notice any joint pain in your foot and ankle, your podiatrist may initially treat your pain with RICE, which stands for:

  • Rest
  • Ice
  • Compression
  • Elevation

Your podiatrist will also recommend limiting walking and bearing weight on the painful foot. Steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, can also help to reduce local inflammation and pain. Custom orthotics may also be prescribed to support the foot, particularly if the issue lies in foot mechanics. If your pain is caused by a condition such as gout, lifestyle changes and alterations in your diet may also help reduce or even eliminate your pain.

If you're experiencing immobilizing joint pain in your feet or ankles, your podiatrist is best equipped to determine the cause and recommend the appropriate treatment. What may seem like joint pain could also be something else entirely, such as a stress fracture, or could be caused by an undiagnosed autoimmune disorder, such as Rheumatoid arthritis. Schedule an appointment today to ensure accurate treatment and a speedy recovery!

By Ankle & Foot Clinic
August 01, 2016
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Gout  

Foot PainsHow many times have you found yourself yelling, “Oh, my aching feet,” but then shrugged it off, figuring that aching feet are a natural part of life? You don’t have to put up with aching feet. Your podiatrist urges you to not ignore that ache in your feet.  When pain occurs, it is the first sign that something isn’t right, so a trip to our practice is in order.

Gout is a form of arthritis, and it can often cause extreme pain to your feet. Approximately one million Americans suffer from gout, and although its source is a systemic problem within the body, there are some suggestions for how to treat gout that may help reduce your chance of having a gout flare-up. 

Diagnosis and Treatment

Because the joint inflammation of gout can resemble that of a joint infection or other forms of arthritis, diagnosing gout requires removing a small amount of fluid from the joint and examining it for uric acid crystals. Once diagnosis is made, your podiatrist can recommend a gout treatment plan to help:

  • Stop acute attacks
  • Rapidly relieve pain and inflammation
  • Avert future attacks
  • Prevent the development of tophi, kidney stones and kidney disease   

Gout treatment will most likely involve anti-inflammatory medications to relieve acute pain and inflammation, as well as urate-lowering drugs to control urate levels and prevent future attacks.

Other gout treatment strategies might include the following:

  • Avoid foods with high purines, such as organ meats, anchovies, shellfish, bacon and gravies, and increasing intake of dairy foods.
  • Avoid alcohol, which increases the production of urate and impairs excretion
  • Lose weight to reduce blood urate levels
  • Avoid medications that contribute to hyperuricemia, including diuretics

With proper treatment by your podiatrist, gout is one of the most controllable forms of arthritis. So when pain occurs, don’t just deal with it, seek treatment immediately. 





This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.