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By [email protected]dfootnorthwest.com
February 19, 2019
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

 

Swelling after foot or ankle surgery can make your splint feel too tight which can be a common source of pain. Watch our video to see Dr. Bowlby demonstrate how to properly loosen your splint if it feels too tight. By clicking below, our step by step video will show you how:

inflammation. Using both warm water to open up blood vessels and cold water to

constrict blood vessels

acts as a pump to push swelling out. All you need is water

,

ice

and two containers

.

Follow these simple steps:

Obtain two

container

s

that your foot

and/or ankle will fit in and fi

ll one with

cold tap water. F

ill the other

with warm

tap

water

, about the temperature

you would use for

bathwater.

Use your fingers fir

st to test that the warm

water is not too hot.

While seated, p

lace

the affected

foot or ankle in the

warm

water first for 4

minutes. This is a good time to do gentile range of motion exercises.

After the 4 minutes is up,

place your foot and/or ankle

in

to the cold water for

1 minute.

Once your foot is in the cold water container,

a

dd 2

-

3 cups of ice

to

the cold water

, one time only

.

Repeat this cycle for a total

of 4 times (a total of

20 minutes

)

each day.

You

do not need to add

more ice with each cyc

le.

*Caution

:

do not perform if you have any open wounds, a history of d

iabetes,

poor

circulation

,

or numbness in your fee

Contrast Baths

Contrast baths are an inexpensive and powerful way to reduce swelling and

inflammation. Using both warm water to open up blood vessels and cold water to

constrict blood vessels

acts as a pump to push swelling out. All you need is water

,

ice

and two containers

.

Follow these simple steps:

Obtain two

container

s

that your foot

and/or ankle will fit in and fi

ll one with

cold tap water. F

ill the other

with warm

tap

water

, about the temperature

you would use for

bathwater.

Use your fingers fir

st to test that the warm

water is not too hot.

While seated, p

lace

the affected

foot or ankle in the

warm

water first for 4

minutes. This is a good time to do gentile range of motion exercises.

After the 4 minutes is up,

place your foot and/or ankle

in

to the cold water for

1 minute.

Once your foot is in the cold water container,

a

dd 2

-

3 cups of ice

to

the cold water

, one time only

.

Repeat this cycle for a total

of 4 times (a total of

20 minutes

)

each day.

You

do not need to add

more ice with each cyc

le.

*Caution

:

do not perform if you have any open wounds, a history of d

iabetes,

poor

circulation

,

or numbness in your feet.

  • A good athletic shoe should not flex through the arch, it should not be able to be easily twisted and it should have a stable heel counter. 
  • Athletic shoes no matter the brand are typically separated into three categories: Neutral, Support, and Motion Control.
  • If you have a high arch, you will benefit from a neutral type athletic shoe.
  • If you have an average to slightly pronated foot type, you will benefit from a support type athletic shoe.
  • If you have a flat foot, you will benefit from a motion control athletic shoe.
  • Athletic shoes wear out after about 500 miles so make sure your shoes aren’t getting too old.

Heel slippage?... try this lacing technique. 

Instead of crisscrossing all the way up the shoe, run the laces up parallel on the last eyelet. Then cross the laces and pull through the loop you have made. This makes the lacing more snug at the ankle and keeps your heel from slipping.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top of Foot Pain?...  try this lacing technique.

Instead of crisscrossing all the way up the shoe, run the laces up parallel when you are halfway up, or where the bump on your foot is. Then finish lacing as you normally would. This makes the lacing leave an opening to give your arch or the sore spot a little more room.

 

 

By Ankle & Foot Clinic of Everett
April 03, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Untagged

Physically active feetYour feet are made up of 26 bones, 33 joints, 112 ligaments and a vast network of tendons, nerves and blood vessels.  Each of these parts works in harmony, enabling you to walk, run and jump normally and without pain.  

But before jumping into a rigorous workout or fitness program that involves running, you may want to give your feet some extra attention, starting with a trip to your Everett podiatrist. A professional podiatrist can properly examine your feet, detect potential problems, and provide tips for injury-free training and shoe selection.

Beginning runners are not the only ones who should see a podiatrist. Frequent runners should also pay their podiatrist a visit from time to time to check for any stress on the lower extremities brought on by repetitive force.

Common injuries experienced by runners include plantar fasciitis, heel spurts, Achilles tendon and stress fractures.

Helpful Tips for Preventing Injury

In addition to visiting either our Arlington or Everett, WA offices, you can also prevent injuries that commonly occur during training and running by stretching properly, choosing appropriate footwear and paying attention to pain or signs of an injury. 

  • Stretch

To prevent injury to your lower extremities, it’s important to stretch carefully before beginning any workout regimen. When muscles are properly warmed up and stretched, the risk for injury is greatly reduced. Appropriate stretches include stretching of the hamstring and wall push-ups.

  • Choose Proper Footwear

The type of shoe you should wear also plays an important role in your ability to run without pain and with optimal performance. The shoe that your foot requires will depend on your foot structure and function, your body type, and the type of running or workout regimen. Your podiatrist may also prescribe an orthotic, or shoe insert, to alleviate any foot pain or anomalies.

  • Be Mindful of Injuries

Even with proper footwear and stretching, not all foot problems can be prevented. Whenever you experience pain, stop whatever workout you are doing and rest. As pain subsides, gradually increase exercise with caution.  When pain persists, visit either our Arlington or Everett, WA offices for a proper evaluation.

New joggers and seasoned runners alike should take the necessary steps to avoid injury to the lower limbs. Consult with your podiatrist before start any new workout, and always seek professional care when pain or injury occurs.

By Ankle & Foot Clinic of Everett
March 15, 2013
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Untagged

Cracked HeelsDry, cracked heels are not only unsightly, but they can also be a source of pain and embarrassment. When the fissures in your heel become so dry and cracked that bleeding or pain when walking occurs, it may be time to seek professional care from your podiatrist at Ankle & Foot Clinic of Everett.  Left untreated, heel fissures can become so deep and painful that it leads to an infection.   

Cracked heels are most commonly caused by splitting of the skin as a result of severe dryness or thickening of a callus on your heel. Severe cases of dry, cracked heels can occur for numerous reasons, including:

  • Cold winter weather or dry climates
  • Dehydration
  • Having diabetes
  • Scrubbing feet too harshly
  • Soaking in a hot bath or shower for too long or too frequently
  • Not moisturizing the feet
  • Increased weight
  • Walking barefoot or wearing open-backed sandals or shoes
  • Prolonged standing at work or home
  • Chronic skin problems, such as eczema or psoriasis

Here are a few tips for keeping heels from cracking:

  • Moisturize the feet daily
  • Avoid walking barefoot or wearing open-backed shoes
  • Opt for mild soaps that won’t dry out your heels
  • Increase your water intake to keep your body hydrated
  • Limit time in the shower as hot water dries out the skin
  • Use a pumice stone or file as directed by your doctor to gently decrease the thick layer of skin

When to Visit Everett

What may begin as an annoyance or simple cosmetic issue, cracked heels can lead to pain and serious infection if not managed properly. Most cases of dry, cracked heels will get better with a little foot pampering or over-the-counter foot cream.

When heels are severely cracked or painful and conservative treatments aren’t effective, visit our Everett, WA office. People with diabetes are at an especially high risk for health problems and should not wait to have dry feet cared for. Severely cracked heels need moisture to avoid pain, bleeding and infection. A podiatrist can work with you to relieve your cracked heels with conservative treatment options.